• MURALIA 2010 (PART 2)

    Published by on 18 de July de 2010 at 13:23

    Articles, magazine

    * Mutha + Rage

    * Besdo Garsia

    * Dream

    * Ogre + Malakkai

    * Pablo + Mutha

    * Mutha + Frik

    * Belin + Malakkai

    * Aroe + Tretze

    * Tretze + Jack

    * All pictures by Brazo de Hierro.

  • MURALIA 2010 (PART 1)

    Published by on 17 de July de 2010 at 0:02

    Articles, magazine

    * 1st wall. AROE

    * 1st wall. OGRE

    * 1st wall. RAGE

    * 2nd wall. FRIK + OGRE + MUTHA + MALAKKAI

    * 2nd wall. TRETZE + RAGE + DUDAX

    * All pictures by Brazo de Hierro.

    * 3rd wall. JACK

    * 3rd wall. MALAKKAI

    * 3rd wall. OGRE

    * 3rd wall. TRETZE + BELIN

    * 3rd wall. AROE

    * 3rd wall. RAGE

    * 3rd wall. FRIK

    * All pictures by Brazo de Hierro.

  • MANKEY. IT’S NEVER ENOUGH…

    Published by on 17 de June de 2010 at 15:30

    Interviews, magazine

    “More than a graffiti writer, I would define myself as a person that likes to, and needs to, paint.”

    Mankey is one of these guys that grew up in the mid-nineties, surrounded by visual stimulus that offered him the world of comics and animation. Using all of these influences as a graphic reference, to which later classic and contemporary art would be added, his discovering graffiti seemed to be something inevitable.

    [separa]

    The technical control of his drawings which he’d acquired in his infancy, and the use of spray cans as a tool for putting his fantasies on a material plane, have acted as the perfect machinery for creating the graphic identity for which we know him today. Less than ten years have passed since his first encounter with aerosol, and he has already begun to show promise of an excellent student.

    [separa]

    What awakens interest in graffiti in a guy from a small town in Valencia?

     

    Since I was small I really liked cartoons and comics. You could say that the origin of graffiti is rooted somewhat in those aesthetics, and that these resources brought me to graffiti. Also, the fact that it was illegal surely had something to do with it.

    [separa]

    It’s obvious that you are (or have been) a devoted reader of comics, and that stories happen in your head that are closer to science fiction that reality…With what genre do you identify with most? Any classic reference?

     

    More than genres, I identify myself with artists like Travis Charest, Bill Sienkiewicz, Madureira, Otomo; and also painters like Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud, Klimt, Dalí, and some other classical artists. All of these points of reference could justify the aesthetic which today breathes in my murals or paintings. Other literary or musical references, like Kase-O, Extremoduro or Sabina, help me when it comes time to express with metaphors or symbols the vision I have of the world.

    [separa]

    In many of your works, the colors which you use move away from the more organic chromatic color range. Does this choice come from your graffiti and design influences? Does it help your work; to escape reality and instead come closer to fiction?

     

    My work can seem fantasy-based, but for the most part they’re related with the reality in which we live. I like to experiment with color, as well as with the sensations I live whilst I’m creating, which help me to communicate in one form or another. Anything that makes a creation beautiful is that uncertainty, and the combination of satisfaction and frustration which surrounds you in the search for the path to follow.

    [separa]

    ¿What’s the meaning behind painting apes? What made you use these characters as your graphic identity?

     

    For me, painting apes shows a representation of how primitive we are, and can be. In reality, the pulses that determine important decisions still are very primal, as primal as the behavior of apes. We human beings use reasoning to control our most primal instincts, but in many occasions this just makes the impulses stronger, which reflects itself in our day to day life.

    [separa]

    Your characters are filled with anguish and rage. Is there something in the author that can only be expressed through your work?

     

    Yeah, of course, it’s a demonstration of my dissatisfaction with what surrounds me. It’s my way of letting it all out, in a placid way, in a way which actually takes me away from it, relaxes me, and relates me to similar people.

    What have you learned from the painters that you admire?

     

    The spirit of their work, the atmosphere, their way of saying things, and the technique used to achieve all of that.

    [separa]

    How was the experience of putting your work on display at Montana Colors Shop & Gallery in Valencia?

     

    It was my first exhibition; honestly, it was really gratifying. From what they told me, it got good recognition. I took into account the context of the exhibition, so I made smaller paintings, more akin to illustration and graffiti than painting, and over all, more in line with the public that was going to be visiting the space. I thank Montana for offering me such a proposal, and for giving me this opportunity.

    [separa]

  • MTN 94 LANDS IN VALPARAISO (CHILE)

    Published by on 16 de June de 2010 at 15:36

    Articles, magazine

    In the south-east of Chile, Valparaíso is found; a port town at the shores of the Pacific, it is the second most important within the country.

    [separa]

    [separa]

    This is precisely where the GP2010 workshops took place, and where Montana Colors contributed, presenting its star product, the MTN 94. This was an inaugural event, held in style, with ample press coverage and institutional presence.

    [separa]

    After seeing the final result, the National Council of Culture and the Arts (CNCA), situated in the same city, can puff out its chest and show with pride the talents of the writers involved, and the excellence of its organizers; IntiHes and Saile.

    [separa]

    The next links have photos of the murals: http://www.graffitivalparaiso.com/blog/lanzamiento-mtn-94/

    [separa]

    At this link you can see how the workshops went: http://www.graffitivalparaiso.com/blog/graffiti-porteno-2010/

    [separa]

    http://www.graffitivalparaiso.com/blog/el-muro-gigante/

    [separa]

    Y desde este fantástico video… Una aportación más al paraíso y al futuro de la escena del graffiti en Chile!

    [separa]

    Agradecimientos especiales a HES.

    [separa]

    [separa]

    [separa]

    [separa]

    [separa]

    [separa]

    [separa]

    [separa]

    [separa]

    [separa]

    [separa]

    [separa]

    [separa]

    [separa]

    [separa]

    [separa]

  • YESK, SPREADING GAME

    Published by on 14 de June de 2010 at 11:32

    Interviews, magazine

    A key piece in the graffiti game is figuring out how to stand out in the crowd. YESK has currently got to be one of the best to sign on to the Barcelona scene. It´s only now, years after his first encounter with graffiti writing, he´s finally found the real meaning behind the philosophy of ¨getting your name up everywhere¨.

    [separa]

    So along those lines he´s been very versatile with his styles showing that whenever you get out of the traditional box doing throw-ups and tags with style, the irony and special charisma of original graffiti are not completely lost. Few know how to sell better than he does.

    [separa]

    Tell us about how you started getting into graffiti

    I started in 2001 under a different name and only doing murals. As the years passed I started to change and do the opposite, and turned into a bit more of a ¨bandit¨. I always liked the murals and I´ll still like them, but with time you discover more about graffiti and you find out that this isn´t only about getting out one Saturday or Sunday to paint a mural.

    [separa]

    At what point did you start to run with the style you do now?

    Esthetically and conceptually I started off doing a very different kind of graffiti. In the process changing your mind or view about something, you always end up picking up other ideas on the way. What I like to do right now is roll playing; throw up my name in a parking garage, along the highway, or train line and not be able to do it in the style I had before. The important thing is getting up. Aside from that, if you feel the heart to add an extra detail, put a little more wrist or curve on it, it´s all up to you.

    [separa]

    You play a big part on the Barcelona scene. What can you tell us about the city?

    I like how there are plenty of shop shutters and how the neighborhoods are so different from each other. The bad thing is there is hardly anybody getting up in high spots and few metro platforms like there are in Paris or Berlin. Graffiti is like a roll playing game where you study the city, the train lines, metro and the streets, trying to bomb places you´ve never been before. It´s like Risk without wars or pistols.

    [separa]

    I remember once when I was painting trains and metro a couple of summers ago, there was a water restriction and the trains stayed painted for weeks. If it were always like that I´d like to paint trains more often. I heard that someone once said ¨painting metro cars is romantic graffiti.¨ You do it for the sensation all the while knowing it probably won´t be circulating later. In a sense, it´s how they started in New York.

    [separa]

    I still think it´s cool even if they buff the piece, you still have a photo. Having said that, I still prefer the street because it´s tough and people get to see it. Graffiti is an activity that when you separate yourself from it, you notice it right away.

    [separa]

    What keeps you motivated to continue writing?

    I tell my parents that I like to paint on the streets because for what ever reason that I may die tomorrow, they would still be able to see me around. It´s like a cry out telling them I´m alive and not so tied down.

    [separa]

    I know it´s so typical to say, but I like the feeling of being at home right now and at the same time somebody is seeing me in some other part of the city.

  • MADRID, NEVER BACKIN´DOWN

    Published by on 7 de June de 2010 at 12:55

    Articles, magazine

    Montana Colors had one of its most happiest moments in recent years, a few weeks ago, during the inauguration of our official store in Madrid (capital city of Spain). The company is originally from Barcelona but has always had a deep respect for the city of Madrid as the starting point for the graffiti movement in Spain. The city has always stayed active, never backing down from any fences or obstacles that the authorities may throw up and isn´t ever phased by their constant buffing or any other type of restrictions they may impose.

    [separa]

    Last Thursday was a day to remember. Not only for the grand opening of the shop but as well as for the presence bestowed upon us by our specially invited guest, BLADE, The King of Graffiti. He rightfully earned that nickname in the subway and train depots of New York in the mid-70´s.

    [separa]

    He was already kinda pumped up, we noticed, when he arrived from the airport talking about…¨I was just doing an exhibition in NYC and Eric Clapton came up to me. He said: ´I want this piece´, and I asked: ´Is it for you!?´, and he said: ´no, its for Paul Mc.Carthney.´¨ Just a small example to give you some sort of idea of where this guy´s art extends to. All the way from underground to mainstream, this 53 year old funkstar is still going strong.

    [separa]

    On an equally memorable note, Os Gemeos, Suso33, KR2 (Deno, Buni), Sagüe and Spit (Barcelona) and Mind (Milan, Italy) did a wonderful piece together the day after the inauguration. Ten minutes into he stepped away from the wall, looked from left to right, got closer to us and whispered, ¨I think I´m going to take it a bit easy…¨. Adrenaline is certainly never something you lose when you´re such a unique and brilliant character.

    [separa]